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of energy in the world, needs to redouble its efforts. the pentagon is already moving in the right direction, but it's not just about saving money in the long term. it's providing operational flexibility and reducing velarde nurblet from inefficient and dangerous fossil fuels. those fuel tanker trucks in afghanistan and iraq might as well have had great big bull's eyes on them for terrorists. the military knows this, and we should give maximum support even in a time of gradually reducing pentagon budgets. this will pay dividends for defense and to the family budget if the pentagon gets it right. it's clear that america is ready and equal to this challenge. the president has signaled his interests in leadership. the question is whether congress is equal to the challenge, ready with innovation, cooperation and leadership. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. poe: mr. speaker, in a remote region of algeria at an oil and gas facility in the dark of night before the sun rose, workers from all over the world were getting ready to si
to bring it here on c-span but the hearing went late. under way at the pentagon, a briefing with general martin dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs and leon panetta, the defense secretary, announcing a change, the lifting of the ban of the use of women in combat. let's get back to the focus of the phone calls here on c-span. biggest foreign policy challenge for the next four years. democratic caller in florida. caller: i have been watching the program all morning and i see the biggest foreign policy challenge in the next four years is not so much one that takes us out of the country as it is bringing democrats and republicans together to do what's best for our country in regards to foreign policy. that's where i see the biggest challenge in the next four years is bringing those two parties together so we can all be safe and enjoy the freedoms that we have today. host: do you think it makes it easier for that to happen with the president appointing someone like john kerry? caller: i think john kerry is a prime example of how we can probably get that done just because of his nature of br
of the united states senate. you can build a pentagon three times in that time frame. it's time that -- to pass a budget out of the united states senate and senator reid should not be paid until it's done. the house has acted responsibly. we have met our deadlines, we have set our priorities, i was part of the house budget committee when we put together budgets that try to get our out-of-control spending under control and rein in our $16 trillion in debt. the sfat has not acted one time in that time frame. it's time to make the hard choices and do the work necessary to restore fiscal responsibility to washington. it's time for senator reid to pass a budget or withhold his paycheck. thank you, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. we'll have order in the chamber, please. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i
recruiter. i have gone to the pentagon in support of the secretary of -- i'm sorry, sergeant major of the army in the 1980's so i'm going to say this and quantify by saying, on a security level, i think secretary clinton handled this very well. in the history of the united states, so much information is being demanded, that breaches security for the department of defense and all the other agencies within the military that i don't think these senators are aware of what they are asking her to divulge. when you say, why wasn't the video available? some information i classified -- is classified to a certain degree that they can't release it immediately. when we have people on foreign soil, our soldiers and marines, their jobs are limited by the act here in the united states and they know they can't go out there and say, hey, you guys are waving these flags, get away or to shoot them. they can't do that. so, to me, naive attitude that the senators who asked those hard questions were asking -- ludicrous. no way they should have been allowed to give responses immediately or to have firsth
to the tune of i think around $89 billion that are going to be put on the pentagon and domestic spending. they're dumb cuts. we are not looking at specific programs in evaluating their worth and eliminating some and keeping others. we just like, chop. this is no way to budget for a nation, and i hope we can delay the sequester. but it's coming up soon. republicans have vowed they want even more cuts maybe in addition to the sequester to negotiate, and i think we should remind everybody we've already had $1.7 trillion in cuts and we just did $600 billion in new revenue. that's about $2.3 trillion, mr. speaker, and, you know, how much more -- how much more cutting do we need to do, particularly when we talk about vital programs for americans? so, mr. speaker, i think if we're going to do cuts we should cut things that we really don't need. for example, medicare part d, passed in 2003, prohibits medicare from negotiating drug prices with the pharmaceutical companies. now, the veterans administration does negotiate for drug prices all the time, but medicare is prohibited from doing so. basically i
was coming out of the pentagon. it was clearly unsettled. it looked much worse than we had thought. the first hope was that if we got saddam hussein, that would solve the problem. we made an effort to do that. appeared from from afar. in december, we picked up saddam. it became obvious that, as one of my guys described, a bunch of former miss -- regime guys were not really running the beginning of the resistance, the beginning of the insurgency. zarqawi had started to build a network that took trained people, or iraqi sunnis -- trained people, iraqi sunnis, who had been dislocated from their position in society, sometimes government, sometimes military might and they were terrified of the shia, which was going to be dominant in the future. you had this combination of factors that was fear of the future, frustration against foreign invaders, and then -- not as much religious extremism as sometimes is perceived. it was not really an al qaeda religious movement. it was a political movement, but he got leveraged by some very clever work by people like abu musab al-zarqawi. we were very sure he wa
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6